Homemade Sriracha Hot Sauce

$25 Gallons of Sriracha

The perennial favourite hot sauce in the big plastic bottle with the rooster on it has a very interesting story. Check it out below… 

  • 1 cup fresh red chiles (habanero, jalapeño, serrano, cayenne, etc.), stems and seeds removed, chopped
  • 3 - 4 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 2 Tbsp white wine vinegar
  • 1+ tsp sugar, to taste
  • ½+ tsp salt, to taste

Add all of the ingredients to a blender or food processor and purée until fairly smooth.  Taste and adjust sugar and salt to suit.

Transfer the mixture to a saucepan and simmer over medium heat for 5 minutes until it loses some of its raw vegetable smell.  Be cautious because heating fresh chiles will release some of their potent aroma!  Allow to cool and then transfer to a bottle or jar.  You can keep it in the refrigerator up to a month.

Recipe from Hot Sauce! by Jennifer Trainer Thompson, an excellent hot sauce resource

What we now think of as that ubiquitious Asian garlic hot sauce was conncocted in 1983 by Chinese-Vietnamese refugee, David Tran, who emigrated to Los Angeles in 1980.  His company, Huy Fong Foods, was named for the Taiwanese freighter that he, and 3,000 other immigrants, traveled in the cargo hold of en route to the United States. The company produces three styles of Southeast Asian sauces (Sriracha, Chile Garlic, and Sambal Oelek) that originally catered to the large ethnic communities in L.A.  His Thai style garlic hot sauce became the favourite and he named it for the port city of Sri Racha in Thailand.  Ripe, red jalapeños grown solely for Huy Fong Foods, are harvested every autumn and turned into enough pepper mash to fill the year long demand for hot sauce production.  Interestingly, the pepper mash on its own is very close to becoming Sambal Oelek.  Garlic is added and it becomes Chile Garlic Paste.  After processing to make it the smooth consistency of ketchup, it becomes Sriracha.  The rooster is David's Chinese astrological sign.  Cool, huh?


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